Copeland Coastal Heritage

The Copeland Coastal Heritage has been with us a while - nearly 2 years really. This project hugged the Cumbrian Coast and followed parts of the England Coast Path. Almost a mirror image of the Sunderland to Seaham Coastal Interpretation we recently completed!

Horden Dene Interpretation

Horden Dene is an area of England on the Durham coast. It was once a colliery here and the beach was (and still is) covered in coal. But since the closure of the mines the coast is regenerating and wildlife that was sitting below the surface is emerging and flourishing. The local community are justly proud of this area and we worked with the community on the sculptural and interpretative outputs for the site.Some extracts from the interpretation panels:

Sunderland to Seaham Interpretation Project

Peggy Potts hoodwinked a customs officer by replacing the illegal alcohol she had in a keg with her own urine!

And so we begin the journey a place where cholera began in this country and was once known once as the “largest shipbuilding town in the world”

The beginning of a journey along the England Coast Path with aorund 18 Interpretation Units telling the story of this heritage coast.

Big Tiles for Oban

The Oban Bay project has been on the go for around 3 years but finally funding was put in place last year and the whole job is now complete. The project involved putting together 7 panels and we chose Enamelled Stoneware for its hardwearing and quite simply gorgeous look. These panels will be going on the railings right on the sea front - so the hazards are sea, salt, wind, high intensity light, herring gull poo and frost.

Flanders Moss Interpretation

Flanders Moss is a vast expanse of all things damp and wonderful. From a distance you can make out the perfectly formed domes of peat as they rise gently from their surroundings. Closer up, squelchy mats of sphagnum moss carpet the reserve with their swirling colours, whilst adders and lizards bask in the sunshine. Listen out for the distinctive calls of snipe and stonechat or feel the slight shudder of the peat as it quakes beneath your feet.